Home most unsafe place for women : A unique court-ordered study by Delhi Police has revealed.

Remaining unseen or unheard doesn’t make women safer. Having a Voice does.

But then, Being Silenced and Being Locked up would make anybody unsafe.

The study affirms what feminists have been saying all along – that asking potential victims to be invisible or to be sexually unattractive to the rapists does not control sexual crimes. (And has not for centuries)

This, and the society’s tolerance towards, and lack of seriousness towards sexual crimes makes criminals fearless. The more likely a criminal is to be excused, the more likely they are to assault. The more voiceless the victim, the more vulnerable they are.

Also – women’s absence from public spaces does not make public spaces safer for women.

We should also acknowledge that the Stranger Rape Myth is a misleading myth that makes it difficult for women to walk out and away from places of crime.

Do read.

Home most unsafe place for women

NEW DELHI: Over 60% offences of rape, molestation and ‘eve teasing’ (sexual harassment) recorded across Delhi till mid-September occurred inside the house and the accused were known to the survivors. A unique court-ordered study by Delhi Police of 44 police stations throughout the capital has revealed that women are most unsafe at home with their relatives or acquaintances.

Related Posts:

What makes men rape?

Study finds 98% of India rape victims knew their attacker.

Crimes against women: Madhya Pradesh tops in rapes, Bengal in total crimes

Martial Arts for women to fight back rapes?

Child marriage “is an evil worse than rape” and should be completely eradicated from society, said a Delhi court

19 Rape Facts that Khaps, Cops and Chautala should know.

Do you see a connection between this murder and the assault in Guwahati?

Can we blame everything on patriarchy?

What kind of men are likely to sexually assault women?

Sexual Assault Prevention Tips Guaranteed to Work!

“This is how we all do it. We find a corner in the house, where the others can’t see, and then dry them.”

What makes changing this so difficult?

“Inside this area was a string, hanging to the sheets, pointing to which Shefali said, “this is where I put it to dry.” She was talking about the used sanitary cloth which she discretely washes at the bore well … I pointed out to her and said that there is no sunlight in that dingy corner. “How would the cloth dry?” I asked.

In a matter-of-fact manner, she looked at me and said, “It’s a used sanitary cloth. How can we dry it outside? This is how we all do it. We find a corner in the house, where the others can’t see, and then dry them.”

“88 percent of India’s 355 million menstruating women have no access to sanitary pads. “

How?

“Not just health, but lack of menstrual hygiene management takes its toll on the education of young girls… almost 23 percent of girls drop out of school when they start menstruating. In some places as many as 66 percent of girls skip school during this time and one-third of them eventually drop out.”

So, what makes changing this so difficult?

“We don’t talk about these issues.”

 

[Read more at: Why menstruation is a nightmare for many women in India, By Kamala Sripada]

Related Posts:

If men could menstruate, this is how little boys would react to their first period.

Some doors are different… they are closed for fifty percent of the population.

Should women go to this temple?

Sex Education has nothing to do with Blue Films.

Being untouchable during periods.

Nepal: Custom & Dangers of Isolation of Women During Menstruation

Have you heard about the menstrual cup?

And yet, like women’s clothing, a woman’s period remains everybody’s business 😦

“…and every month if my periods get delayed I am given a weird look and it clearly shows that she is afraid i might get pregnant again.”

Who is afraid of awareness about menstruation, and open letters to all Gynaecologists?

New scare for urban women: Menopause in 20s

What do you find offensive enough to make you violent?

The only way to control violence and rioting is by controlling those who are violent – those who burn buses, or kill or attack other people (no matter what they claim ‘provoked’ them).

Same as rape. The only way to prevent sexual assaults is by controlling those who commit these assaults. No matter what they claim ‘provoked’ them.

Same as thefts. Murders. Child abuse. The only way to control any crime is to control those who commit the crime.

And for this we must acknowledge that Violence is the crime – not dissent, disagreements, western-clothing, wealth, poverty or ignorance.

So this is not going to control violence. It might do the opposite. It might suppress voices and create a sense of entitlement in those who see violence as a legitimate means to express disagreement.

Maharashtra police to crack whip on those who ‘like’ offensive Facebook posts

MUMBAI: In an attempt to contain protests over objectionable posts on a social networking site about Chhatrapati Shivaji, Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar and the late Shiv Sena chief Bal Thackeray, the Maharashtra police have decided to take action even against those who ‘like’ the controversial posts.

Those who ‘like’ such posts will be booked under the Information Technology Act and under the Code of Criminal Procedure, the Nanded police have said. A person could face three to five years in jail if convicted under Section 66 (a) of the IT Act (punishment for sending offensive messages through communication service, etc), applied in this case.

 

It seems just like we tolerate rape-apologists deciding who is to blame for rapes, now we are letting Violence-Apologists decide who is to be blamed for violence. (FB-likes in this case)

😦

What do you find offensive enough to make you violent? Is it legal for you to be offended enough to get violent?

I gave it a lot of thought, and I think the only thing that can make me violent is defence from violence.

But then it seems there are some people who tend to get violent – what should be their legal rights? Should they have The  Right to Take Offence? And should those who offend them risk being jailed?

Related Posts:

“Tell me will you ever think of putting any posts on facebook after this?” “No.”

Who defines the ‘limits’ of your freedom?

Is Democracy possible without a chance for everyone to argue about issues that matter to them?

So who said these words, and do you disagree?

What is it that you would never blog about?

Freedom of expression comes with responsibility. The responsibility to protect it from censorship.

Are u ok if ur daughter smokes at 24yrs to express herself? Freedom of expression is quite quite difficult to practice.

Why do we hear concerned voices about ‘misuse of freedom’ the moment we talk about Freedom?

When Kumar Vishwas quoted these lines from my sidebar 🙂

Trying to understand a blogger’s legal rights and responsibilities.

So we criticise Comedy Nights with Kapil. And we criticise political leaders who make misogynistic statements.

So we criticise Comedy Nights with Kapil [link]. And we criticise (or strongly condemn) political leaders who make misogynistic statements.

I think there is a difference (Please correct me if I am wrong) – Comedy Nights with Kapil is not paid to represent us or our interests, it’s a commercial enterprise, we are free to disapprove and stop watching the show.

I don’t think we can or should attempt to silence misogynistic voices, one, because they have the right to voice their opinions (however offensive we find them), and two because there are probably many others who hold the same views and perhaps it would be much better to start a conversation about why the ideas are so offensive to us.

Silencing will not change misogynistic views – talking about them would ensure that the other more rational view is heard.

Silencing is not a good idea anyway. When the Silencing of Voices begins – it always begins with silencing of the unpopular voices first. Obviously.

There are countries where feminists (or Liberal views) are not allowed a Voice. That makes it very easy for feminists to be made unpopular, and since they are allowed no voice they have no opportunity to become ‘popular’. And unpopular voices are amongst the first to be silenced.

So if we want our own voices to be heard, we have no choice but to allow others the have their say too. Would some of us rather hear what we like to hear at the risk of being denied the Truth?

There can be no Freedom, Equality and Justice without the right to speech. And those who have the most power and most responsibility should be accountable to those they serve.

For example, what if we could not blog about these two cases?

‘The liberties that are guaranteed to our citizens, cannot be stretched beyond limits nor can such freedom be made weapons to destroy our fundamental values or social establishments like families’

Parents should choose the boy for a girl aged below 21, as it is they who bear the brunt of an unsuccessful marriage – Karnataka HC

Women have been denied the right to speech (or Freedom of Expression) for centuries and it lead to women being the least valued in the society, seen and valued only as future wives and daughters in law.

I think the only speech that should be censored is the one that directly leads to violence to others (Hate speech).

But this is only when equal citizens are in disagreement.

What about when we criticise political leaders who make misogynistic statements? (or say anything else we disagree with/disapprove of?) Unlike Comedy Nights we do pay them to represent us, and we have authorised them to make laws to ensure that our Fundamental Rights are protected.

I think we have more right to challenge political leaders who make statements that indicate that they are disrespectful of our Fundamental Rights – including the right to have a Voice and the rights to Justice and Equality.

Do you agree?

Related Posts:

“Tell me will you ever think of putting any posts on facebook after this?” “No.”

Is Democracy possible without a chance for everyone to argue about issues that matter to them?

So who said these words, and do you disagree?

What is it that you would never blog about?

Why do we hear concerned voices about ‘misuse of freedom’ the moment we talk about Freedom?

Are u ok if ur daughter smokes at 24yrs to express herself? Freedom of expression is quite quite difficult to practice.

Who defines the ‘limits’ of your freedom?