The forensic reports ruled out rape and CBI found nothing against the four who were accused of raping and killing them.

Here’s why we need thorough investigation of every crime and why castration by violent mobs should not be seen as justice.

Remember the outrage in response to the photographs of the teenage sisters in UP, found hanging from a tree? Now, the forensic reports ruled out rape and CBI found nothing against the four who were accused of raping and killing them.

Could outraged angry mobs have done justice in this case?

The three member medical board has given their preliminary report to the CBI and the detailed report is still awaited and preliminary report of the medical board points out that the Sexual assault angle of both victims completely appears unlikely …

Read the details here: ‘Forced suicide’ twist to Badaun girl’ case

image

This is how Mob Justice works.

‘Today in a different part of India, a mob did take ‘law’ into its own hands. This mob, composed of Kannada language extremists, decided that those who don’t speak Kannada don’t deserve to be in the state of Karnataka and decided to teach them a lesson by beating them up.’ [Read more –Mob Justice: The Mob does what it decides as right. ]

Related Posts:

Mob Justice: The Mob does what it decides as right.

Delhi gangrape case: Prime accused Ram Singh commits suicide

‘Angry Mob cut off man’s sensual organ for attempting rape of a girl.’

Allahabad girl Aarti Yadav beats harasser, sets bike on fire

Do you remember this murdered couple who made a ‘dramatic reappearance’?

No second chances for an Indian daughter.

12 thoughts on “The forensic reports ruled out rape and CBI found nothing against the four who were accused of raping and killing them.

  1. //Could outraged angry mobs have done justice in this case?//
    Maybe. But would that be true for every case?
    Can violent action help solve all crises?
    Can “justice” be served over flaring tempers and people with questionable motives?
    Can we say for sure do we know they’re not motivated by vengeance?

    I don’t know how to put it mildly, but I have been, and will always be against mob justice.

    Like

  2. No matter how frustrated we are, we still have to strive for the right thing, however difficult that may be or however long that takes. If it takes us several decades to get our law enforcement to work properly, then that means there are several factors getting in the way – lack of awareness of human rights, corruption, inefficiency, lethargy, cynicism. These 5 issues are so deep and intrinsic that yes, it will take decades to get our law enforcement in working order. And yes, waiting for decades is not easy. But what do we owe our future generations? We owe them the ground work needed to make such changes possible. We owe it to them to fix the potholes so they can begin building the road. By encouraging mob justice, we are destroying any hope for future generations of ever building that road.

    To quote Dumbledore, “We must all choose between what is right and what is easy.” Due process is right. Mob justice is easy.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Anger can be a good thing if it is channeled properly. If you are angry or frustrated with the way criminals are getting away, then do something constructive about it. Get involved. Start or join a volunteer organization that strives to change things in the country. Or at least stand up for rules in a public place. Speak up when rules are being violated. This is our country and if we want it to be better, we have to DO something about it, it is not going to magically transform itself. And stop blaming politicians. They come from us. They are only slightly worse than us. If they are evil and corrupt, we are selfish and un-involved. As long as we remain un-involved, we deserve anarchy.
    A simple example – I was standing in line to board a Singapore Airlines flight to India. A man cuts in line in front of me.
    I tell him, “Excuse me sir, this is a line. Please join at the end.”
    He replies mockingly, “Oh thank you very much for telling me, I didn’t know!” And tries to cut in anyway.
    I block him. He tries to get in behind me. My 15 year old son blocks him and shoots him a dirty look.
    He gets behind my son. The lady standing behind my son has heard the entire conversation, yet she lets him in. Yet, she does not stand up to him. Nor does the guy behind her who is also listening.
    My son who has seen this often in India says, “Mom, they taught us in pre-school not to cut in line. What’s wrong with these people?”
    “The problem is – one, there is a complete disregard for rules and two, no one wants to get involved,” I reply.
    As long as we don’t get involved and don’t say NO to rule breaking, things will not change. And in the meantime, violence will not help, violence is the biggest form of rule breaking, and it is the surest way to build an uncivilized society.

    Liked by 1 person

    • US to Singapore flights are orderly and everything is fine, once in Singapore desiness kicks in these same people who timidly followed the rules from US to Singapore all of sudden become so bold to flock the boarding gates and mob them down. DG had mentioned this experience here sometime ago and she seconds you. These are the same people who are grumpy in the US for following rules and once on the desi turf they blossom into ninjas breaking all rules.

      I am appalled at the comments on the fb link posted here.

      To speak up and to stand up is the only way to go…
      Peace,
      Desi

      Like

      • Rule breaking Ninjas indeed! Once when I was still living in India, I was 19 and my mother and I went to visit relatives in Berhampur. This is a very short stop so people have only 5 minutes to get in or out. When we tried to get out at our station, 50 people were trying to get in and 50 people were trying to get out AT THE SAME TIME and get this – THROUGH THE SAME DOOR. Everyone was arm wrestling everyone else. The women with young children and those with older people in tow had the hardest time. My mother was in her early 50s back then – I looked at her face and she looked very scared. We both thought we would end up having to go to the next stop – Bhubhaneshwar. WHY IS THERE NO ‘IN’ AND ‘OUT’ DOOR and if they exist why is no one using it? And look at our great Indian culture and tradition respecting mothers. No one really cared about who was shoving my mother, clearly an older lady who needed help. Somehow I wrapped my arms around her, squeezed my way out of there (am not really a big, strong person) and we actually fell down on the platform.

        We can start with civic offenses and fix them first. I do not think it’s lack of civic sense or ignorance. It’s more like, “I can get away with this, so why not?” This mindset underlies both civic and criminal offenses in our country. Let’s attempt to change that mindset.

        Like

    • I agree with you. Here in Singapore, most Indian tourists tend to cut queue at taxi stands and bus interchanges. When questioned, they usually say they are tourists and do not know the rules. Tourists or not, is it not simple common sense to not to cut a queue! I am frequently asked if it is common in our culture that people do not follow rules, women are raped, and people do not say ‘please’, ‘thank you’ and ‘sorry’ often.

      I am a Kannadiga. Most Kannadigas are peace-loving people and incidents such as these should not make people think that Kannadigas are racists or language fanatics. I condemn the attack on Michael and his friends. They should not have been attacked the way they were. However, I think most news reports have not covered as to what exactly happened at the restaurant. However, I have seen few non-Kannadigas, who live in Karnataka, speaking ill of Kannada (frequently mis-pronouncing it as Kannad) and the Kannadiga culture. They need not speak the language, but they can refrain from making negative comments about the language. No language is inferior,

      Liked by 1 person

      • This is a tough one. I agree that no language is inferior. I also agree that it’ll be nice if people refrain from making negative comments about a language or community. It is always a good idea to be polite and not hurt anyone’s feelings. However, in a free country, people are entitled to make negative comments about anything or anyone without being harmed or deprived in any way. If the comments are untrue and serious enough to merit legal action, then the offended person(s) can take that course. Otherwise, everyone is entitled to make negative comments. Others can either choose to ignore it or respond in kind without resorting to physical violence.

        So when you say “However, I think most news reports have not covered as to what exactly happened at the restaurant” I’m not sure how it is relevant here. Unless Michael and his friends actually initiated or escalated the physical confrontation, whatever they said in the restaurant cannot be used as a justification for the attack.

        Like

        • I do not justify the attack in any way. Few news reports mentioned that Michael and his friends made some derogatory remarks about the language and that led to the attack, while some reports mentioned that the accused were drunk and hence they attacked. Other news reports mentioned that Michael and his friends were talking very loudly and the accused asked them to speak in a soft tone, M and his friends refused and that led to the attack. I was referring to the mob justice piece of the post and the “Kannada language extremists” term used. I was trying to mention that while news reports were quick to point out the three Kannadigas attacked NE youth, they did not mention what exactly might have happened at the restaurant that led to the attack.

          Everyone is entitled to comments – negative or positive. But making negative comments in a derogatory way is not acceptable. Correct?

          Like

  4. To add to what Sandhya has said above, this clearly is a case of the english language media twisting facts and sensationalizing what was a regular brawl to give it a ‘racist’ color. Multiple reports have said that it started as an argument that escalated into a fight and when the NE youth started abusing in English , the ‘attackers’ asked them to speak in Kannada being in Karnataka. So So how fair is it to color this as a racist attack ? There are more non locals (more than any other metro in India perhaps) happily living in Bangalore for generations without learning a word of Kannada (again I don’t think there are as many locals living in another Indian metro without learning the local language, not even Mumbai). So how come these people are not attacked day in and day out for not learning the language ? I’d say there is more disrespect shown to the local people and language by the migrants in Bangalore than the outsiders being mistreated for not knowing the language. The media reports are trying to paint such a distorted version of the incident and the context just trying to rile up people and sensationalize the incident without an iota of journalistic integrity.

    Like

  5. Pingback: This Video Of An Indian Girl Confronting Her Alleged Harasser On A Flight | The Life and Times of an Indian Homemaker

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s