What part of “liberation for women” is not for you?

“Do you have a vagina?” she writes. “Do you want to be in charge of it?” If you said yes to both, “Congratulations! You’re a feminist.”

About sexism.

…simply apply this question to the issue: Is this polite? If we—the entire population of the earth, male and female alike—are just, essentially, “the guys,” then was one of the guys just . . . uncouth to a fellow guy? Don’t call it sexism. Call it “manners” instead.

…neither “pro-women” nor “anti-men.” I’m just “Thumbs up for the six billion.”

Have you read this book? I did recently (thanks to Allytude) and ended up wanting to highlight and bookmark the entire book🙂

Allytude shared this.

IHM

 I just started reading “How to be a woman” by Caitlin Moran.
 
She is brilliant.
 
Here are a few quotes
 
What do you think feminism IS, ladies? What part of “liberation for women” is not for you? Is it freedom to vote? The right not to be owned by the man you marry? The campaign for equal pay? “Vogue,” by Madonna? Jeans? Did all that good shit GET ON YOUR NERVES? Or were you just DRUNK AT THE TIME OF SURVEY?
Moran, Caitlin (2012-07-17). How to Be a Woman (p. 80). Harper Collins, Inc.. Kindle Edition.
The more women argue, loudly, against feminism, the more they both prove it exists and that they enjoy its hard-won privileges.
Moran, Caitlin (2012-07-17). How to Be a Woman (p. 80). Harper Collins, Inc.. Kindle Edition.
When people suggest that what, all along, has been holding women back is other women bitching about each other, I think they’re severely overestimating the power of a catty zinger during a cigarette break. We have to remember that snidely saying, “Her hair’s a bit limp on top” isn’t what’s keeping womankind from closing the 30 percent pay gap and a place on the board of directors. I think that’s more likely to be down to tens of thousands of years of ingrained social, political, and economic misogyny and the patriarchy, tbh. That’s just got slightly more leverage than a gag about someone’s bad trousers. Moran, Caitlin (2012-07-17). How to Be a Woman (p. 86). Harper Collins, Inc.. Kindle Edition.
It was the “Are the boys doing it?” basis on which I finally decided I was against women wearing burkas. Yes, the idea is that it protects your modesty and ensures that people regard you as a human being, rather than just asexual object. Fair enough. But who are you being protected from? Men. And who— so long as you play by the rules and wear the correct clothes— is protecting you from the men? Men. And who is it that is regarding you as just a sexual object, instead of another human being, in the first place? Men Moran, Caitlin (2012-07-17). How to Be a Woman (p. 87). Harper Collins, Inc.. Kindle Edition.
What is feminism? Simply the belief that women should be as free as men, however nuts, dim, deluded, badly dressed, fat, receding, lazy, and smug they might be. Moran, Caitlin (2012-07-17). How to Be a Woman (p. 88). Harper Collins, Inc.. Kindle Edition.
-Allytude
If you have read it, please do share your favorite parts.

74 thoughts on “What part of “liberation for women” is not for you?

      • Actually the first line was probably meant to grab your attention.

        Vagina.

        See how this comment suddenly attracts more eyeballs? No, really. I’ve seen publishers ask authors to “reorganize” a book or rewrite a preface for “impact”.

        Like

  1. This is the crux of it

    The more women argue, loudly, against feminism, the more they both prove it exists and that they enjoy its hard-won privileges.
    sharing it on FB ..I have to get this book .

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  2. I picked up this book thanks to Smitha’s strong reco and I had a blast reading it, IHM! I loved Moran’s style of writing and her observations!

    “The more women argue, loudly, against feminism, the more they both prove it exists and that they enjoy its hard-won privileges.” this quote stood out for me as well all through. She is so very right, isnt she?!

    And I so with you on bookmarking the entire book! 🙂

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  3. thankfully, most women think of themselves as individuals, and not a part of the feminist ummah that promotes victimhood and asks its members to wage jihad on the evil satan known as man.

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    • Anon, like Arun mentioned feminism is not about men vs women. British journalist Rebecca West is supposed to have said, “Feminism is the radical notion that women are people too”. That’s all feminism is about. Nothing more, nothing less.

      Women may or may not think of themselves as individuals, but the problem is that they are not treated as individuals (with the basic rights and dignity that should be accorded to individual human beings)…especially in a country like ours where violent crimes against women (for which the women themselves would be blamed) are an everyday occurence. Even women who do not face any violence find their basic rights violated on a regular basis. Only someone who has his/her head buried in the sand would think that we have no need for feminism.

      It’s not just our country. Feminism is also very much still required in the west where there is a lot of sexism and misogyny (though not so obvious as we have in our country)…

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    • @ Arun: “Feminism do not promote war between genders. it is a corrective movement of progressive men and Women against Patriarchal oppression.”
      I don’t think there is any single universal school of feminism that everyone agrees on. The kind of feminism put forth by Anon is as real as your idea.
       
      One of the reasons I distangle myself from gender feminism in the Hindu world, inspite of being a social egalitarian, is that a lot of mainland Indian feminists see gender equality as a zero sum game. The fight for equality of men and women is seen as a war between the genders. excluding the far more complex interplay of feudal hierarchy in creating such an unequal society in the first place. Casteism and gender inequality go hand-in-hand, even if the connection is oblivious to those who look at it without any sociological perspective.
       
      A lot of feminists in mainland India, who cry about male privilege have no qualms using their women’s privilege (which exists, even in some misogynist societies) to their advantage, even if it is unethical from a purely humanistic point of view. They also seem to condone male gender roles, while condemning the female gender roles – effectively wanting to rights of both gender roles and the ‘duties’ of none. As I see it, the technical term to refer to such an attitude is ‘hypocrisy’.
       
      Even among feminists who are above all these, there is a silent acceptance of such un-egalitarian feminism, the same way there is a slent acceptance of Islamic fundamentalism among conservative Muslims.

      Like

      • Atheist Indian,
        I do not think any feminist philosophy actually calls for war between genders. If you have any links to such writings please share.
        Some individual females may be taking advantage of a liberal partner by being a hypocrite. But can’t blame the ism for that.

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      • > The kind of feminism put forth by Anon is as real as your idea.

        Not just real. I fear, even a significant fraction of people would align on Anon’s version.

        For many many reasons, people seem to aggregate into groups with polar opposite viewpoints. And given that extreme view points naturally garner more visibility, I see outright male chauvinism and “Feminazism” far more often than the expression of a balanced middle.

        Like

        • Male chauvinism victimises men as much as women and children, it expects men to behave like ‘macho men’, which looks at aggression as a desirable way for dealing with conflicts… also expects men to control the lives and choices of people they are related to…

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        • @ Atheist Indian; @TheSlightlyChauvinistIyer : We have seen (and disagreed on) a lot of examples in this blog as to what constitutes male chauvinism, sexism, misogyny, patriarchy etc. Would love to see some examples as to what behavior you consider as “Feminazism” or examples where you feel women victimise men as a matter of course. To me, the word “Feminazi” is like the phrase “militant atheist” – just a way to demonize a group in a manner highly disproportionate to their actual actions on the ground. Anyway, what do I know? Please send across examples why you think it fair to equate Nazism (one of the vilest movements of the last century) with Feminism…I, for one, would find it interesting.

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        • Feminazi – It’s mostly used by the likes of Rush Limbaugh to label and vilify women. When women have a valid argument he cannot dismiss, he labels them as whores or feminazis. It isn’t a “real” word, it’s only used by the Fox-network-viewing-and-trusting demographic, and their “leaders” – religious fundamentalists, extreme male chauvinists, and the far-right .

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      • @ Arun
        I have nothing against feminist philosophy (even if we can even use that word, given that there is no coherent and unambiguous idea of what ‘feminist philosophy’ is about). The philosophies of liberal feminism are fine and dandy; just like the core philosophies of socialism, anarchism and a lot of other -isms.
         
        However, my real concern is how women who subscribe to the feminist philosophies behave in the real world – their actual attitudes and behaviours as compared to their proclamations of the philosophies they subscribe to. It isn’t very different from men who espouse ideals of feminism and gender equality in words, but are chauvinistic jerks in deeds. For a lot of feminists, feminism has become the cruch to wallow in self-pity against their own laziness, lack of initiative and decisiveness in life. Or use feminism as a weapon to express their disgust and/or hate of men.
         
        And no, I can’t provide links. My experiences have largely been anecdotal, not internet demagogy. Another facet of human nature in general and Indian people in particular, is the dissonance between words and actions. You know people ONLY when you interact with them in real life and have the social experience to understand the ‘show’ from the ‘real’. And from what I have observed and experienced, very few Indian people, feminist or otherwise, actually have liberal or egalitarian attitudes towards life, even if they espouse the said ideals in words. It is more like lazy people putting ‘hard working and focused’ in their job resumes. The feminist example would be a woman who verbally espouses gender equality but treats her househelp with disgust and contempt (~for poverty, rather than any actual offence).
         
        @ Satish
        I never associated or demonised feminism with Nazism so lets not go there. And by the way, I have been called a radical atheist, devil worshipper, satan’s backfoot and such a couple of times. Even though I am none of these, I don’t think the words affect me as much to be demonising. If I list some of the social prejudices and inegalitarianism that a lot of feminists use towards their (~supposed) strive for equality, there won’t be any space in this comment thread. Maybe I’ll write a post about it in my blog.

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        • Atheist Indian,
          You can argue that ideally a Feminist should be a Humanist in all sense. Thus he or she should not be casteist,autocratic,racist, fascist, language chauvinist etc etc.
          Practically we are the
          products of our environment. Each one of us have imbibed from our surroundings lots of prejudices. Thus some one who strongly argue for a Democratic polity may be an autocrat at home. That do not mean the idea of Democracy is bad. That only means he has not fully understood what democracy is. Similarly a feminist with caste or class or race prejudice can be called an incomplete feminist.  

          Like

  4. While I don’t agree with the first line, and I think anyone can be a feminist, vagina or otherwise, the book sounds great! There are SO many things I’d like to mention, but most fundamentally the fact that I’m waiting for the day when I can behave exactly like a man behaves in today’s society and people will consider this behaviour regular, and not something out of the ordinary, or special, or pathbreaking. Just…normal.

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  5. What is feminism? Simply the belief that women should be as free as men, however nuts, dim, deluded, badly dressed, fat, receding, lazy, and smug they might be.
    SO true!!

    I need to pick this one up. Sounds like a good read!

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  6. The only part I don’t agree with is the part about the burka. I know a few women who wear the hijab, and they do it because they want to, out of their own free will. I don’t think anyone should be telling you what to wear, including religious texts, but if you feel more comfortable wearing the burka, so be it.

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    • That’s what I used to think too…but on thinking it over, it doesn’t make sense…why would any human being actually prefer to remain faceless, formless entities in public without any identity of their own? Let’s try to go one level deeper and see why do a lot of islamic women wear the hijab…
      1. Main reason I see is that they wear the hijab because they are expected to wear it by their parents or their husbands or their religion or their society at large. They are conditioned to conform to those expectations. Like you said, they are free to conform to any expectations they want, but is it wrong to point out that those expectations are unfair and skewed against them?
      2. Some women wear the hijab because it gives them a feeling of anonymity and safety…What do they mean by that? Safety from what and whom? When you get right down to it, it’s pretty much safety from male gaze and male harassment. Again, they are free to wear it if it makes them feel safe, but is it wrong to point out that they are being unfairly required to change their behavior and restrict themselves when the fault actually lies with the men who make them uncomfortable?
      3. If you discount the above two reasons, there may be women who like wearing the burkha/hijab from time to time as part of their public ensemble. But I highly doubt if there are women who like the burkha/hijab so much that they want it to be the only part of their public ensemble

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      • Just an aside – hijab is not the same as the burkha. It only covers the head and the neck, not the face. Personally I think it looks rather pretty and have covered myself in a scarf in front of the bathroom mirror just to preen.😛 I wouldn’t put the burkha and hijab on par with each other.

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      • May be another reason is burkha/hijab is becoming more and more a part of identity politics or even a in strange twisted way a symbol of liberty.
        In Turkey, the Military Govt for decades put severe restrictions against hijab, so much so that wearing it became a sign of defiance and revolt for predominantly Patriarchal/religious pro democracy movements.

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      • All your reasons make sense, but just as I wouldn’t want people to tell me not to wear certain items of clothing such as the bikini(which seems offensive to a large segment of the Indian population), I wouldn’t want anyone to tell me not to wear the hijab if I actually want to wear it. I agree that a lot of women are forced to wear it by their religion, but I’m not sure banning the hijab altogether would help that cause. As for the social indoctrination bit: I’m not too sure about that. Some Muslim women actually make a conscious choice to wear the hijab, the same as non-Muslim women making a conscious choice to wear a dress or jeans or whatever.

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        • Everytime someone talks about free will or conscious choice, I question the origin of it. Do you truly have free will if:
          1. You grew up in an environment that propagated a certain set of religious rules and they are different for different genders, statuses, and such? No I don’t think so.
          2. If women of certain faith had truly the right to make a conscious choice of attire (hijab: muslim, ghungat:certain hindus, etc.) then they would have a choice from a range of clothing and would not be stoned, outcasted, and such for choosing any different. Hence the comparison of such clothing items to jeans is a non existent argument.

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        • B,
          There should not be a social ban on any sort of attire. The recent bans in some European Countries of full covering Burkha can be considered as as an assault on women’s rights. Such bans usually make the attire popular as a protest symbol.
          What those Govts should have done is to ensure the rights of women to use what ever dress they want and protect them from religious patriarchal restrictions.

          Like

        • I don’t know about the religious side of it (is there really something that explicitly says that women should cover their hair and bodies?), but I think it is mostly social conditioning that makes women wear burkas. It’s similar to how not wearing shorts is expected of a woman, and how it attracts unwanted attention if a woman does show her legs. If it was the norm for women to wear burkas where I live or in my community, I wouldn’t want to stand out as the whore of babylon and attract unwanted attention either… Ideally though this is not the sort of choice that should be applauded because of the reasoning behind it, even if it IS a choice.

          Having said that I think some women in hijabs (just the hair covering) do look beautiful. Especially when the scarves are colorful and are a form of expression (it is a style CHOICE). But when I see burkas I just think whyyyy. That too in a tropical climate. I do agree with the burka ban though up to a point…just for identification purposes at least let the face be visible…but covering or not covering up anything else is personal choice.

          Like

        • Conscious choice of wearing anything you like sounds logical but hijab or Burkha dont seem to be in such category since they are strongly associated with the religion and certain restriction ONLY WOMEN are suppossed to follow .If women willingly conform to those , they may be making a choice to conform, but paradoxically ,deep down conforming to riligious expectations is a mental programming which leaves very little scope for personal choice. so , conforming to religious dress code as a path of least resistance and acceptance may be a choice but wearing whatever one likes may not be a choice with them.
          I find this hard to digest that anyone would like to wear a dress that symbolises anonimity, nonentity ,which distinguishes you on the basis of your sexuality ,out of their own free will and not as a cultural or religious baggage.

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        • if wearing a hijab or ghunghat can be seen as a conscious choice without any influence on thinking by religion /culture etc and independent of their sexuality and if it does not signify as unspelt expectations from women to conform then why do I not see any non muslim women choosing hijab/burqa or many young girls not opting for ghunghat out of choice despite their cultural background and family being Ok with non ghunghat dressing?

          Like

    • Being indoctrinated since you were born =/= ‘free will’. They’ve been brought up being TAUGHT through religious texts and elders and everyone else with an opinion that that is the ‘right thing’, which they then begin believing to be true. It’s like Stockholm Syndrome, except with an idea.

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      • > Being indoctrinated since you were born =/= ‘free will’.
        That. That alone is going to be an article in my blog and a maybe even chapter in my book when I get around to it.

        Now, what worries me is that the same argument can be used by my detractors. If Caitlin Moran’s book influences me, am I any longer applying free will?

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        • I think if you are able to use the same free will to criticise Caitlin Moran’s words then you are not indoctrinated – I would be suspicious of a fear of/resistance to a free and open discussion by any follower.

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        • Our thoughts and opinions are not really free. May be less than a percent may be our own, but the rest are what we get from others. Environment plays a major role in how we formulate our opinions.
          Radical Feminist thoughts are only few decades old. Why no one had such views in 17th century? If there was a real and genuine free thinking it should have been there before.
          It was Science/Technology revolution that changed the thinking of humankind

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        • “Environment plays a major role in how we formulate our opinions.”
          Agree. The debate on the philosophical concept of free will will take far more time and space to be discussed here, but your way of putting it was concise and to the point. As much as we like to believe that our wills are free of prejudice and influence, it isn’t so. No individual human mind is above the petty prejudices, purility and self-centered thinking that every other human mind is mired in. A lot of Indians seem to have a purile view of the western world as the bastion of free thinking and liberalism, but without the exception of Europe, my observation has been otherwise. American people for example, are as susceptible to the same kind of rigid thinking styles and conservatism that Indians are prone to – the differences are the parameters, tolerance level for differing opinions and the cultural framework.
           
          From what I have learned and observed in the world, people pretty much have their values solidified somewhere in their late teens. Their thinking styles are heavily influenced by parents, religions, their social circle, their socio-economic conditions, TVs, films and for the reading type – books as well. After that, it is very difficult to change values at a core level, the only possible change is on a purile, superficial level – such as dress or attitudes.
           
          Having said that, I strongly oppose the burka because even if we overlook the free will debate and understand it in conventional terms (~not something imposed on a reluctant), the burka is less a dress choice for most Muslims and more a complex interplay of conformism, religious communitarianism and gender inequality.

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      • I don’t know. I know a lot of very free thinking strong women who wear the hijab. It has always seemed a paradox to me, but I wouldn’t be so quick to judge, Maybe, as an atheist, I just don’t see where that comes from, and I choose not to condescend to it,

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        • “If women of certain faith had truly the right to make a conscious choice of attire (hijab: muslim, ghungat:certain hindus, etc.) then they would have a choice from a range of clothing and would not be stoned, outcasted, and such for choosing any different.”
          The type of women I am talking about do have a choice. Have you read Does My Head Look Big In This? It is a good example.
          Right now, the problem is that women who CHOOSE(and are not forced)to wear the hijab/burka are discriminated against. Like “oh my god she must be so weak and i really feel sorry for her/her parents must have forced her”. It’s no different from people inferring that a woman who wears shorts is of questionable moral character. You wouldn’t condemn women who CHOOSE to wear shorts;then why condemn women who CHOOSE to wear the burka?

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    • @ Satish
      You are trying to infer logical reasons for wearing the burka where there is very little.

      There are a small number of women, who wear the burka and turn to Islamic conservatism out of their own free will, as a politico-religious statement against a westernised society, which they don’t find to their taste.

      There is also another segment of women, who start donning the burka once they have a couple of kids and their bodies are no longer in shape; to conceal themselves and mentally isolate themselves from the social pressure to look good.

      But for the majority of Muslim women, it is religious indocrination. If they want ot enter Islamic paradise – they must obey the fardh (obligations) of the Muslim scriptures, one of which is covering up their bodies. The conservative Muslim male’s tendency to don the beard, shave the moustache and wear pan-Islamic style clothing comes from the same corner of the woods, psychologically speaking.

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      • > But for the majority of Muslim women,
        > it is religious indocrination. If they want ot
        > enter Islamic paradise – they must obey
        > the fardh

        I agree with you that it is indoctrination for the vast majority. But your elaboration on that is somewhat narrow.

        Some wear it because feel safer, having cultivated a feeling of uneasiness of what they perceive to be evil intentions of unknown men. This I heard directly from somebody who works at my wife’s work place. Also, the instinct to avoid attention from many men, apparently has some evolutionary basis and is not just a product of one’s environment and upbringing i.e not indoctrination.

        Some are just not willing to oppose elders or society. A young woman sat opposite me on a train a decade ago and was followed by what I could make out was her mother-in-law who went on to sit next to her. The young woman was loudly ordered to draw her veil down and button up her burka in a manner that startled me. The order was swiftly complied with. (The mother in law, strangely had her veil up throughout the trip. The young woman frequently lifted her veil to make quick conversation but seemed unwilling to demand any greater leniency).

        Some just start doing it out of habit long after they need to. This is hard to explain, but something as silly as the lack of weight of my cell phone or keys in one of my pockets (when I’ve briefly placed them in my drawer) frequently draws my attention away from my regular train of thought.

        And then some, as you pointed out, really believe that the scriptures have to be followed religiously through indoctrination.

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        • “Some are just not willing to oppose elders or society.”
          Good point. If they are unwilling to oppose their elders out of their own free will (a paradox), it is all right. However, what I see is a lot of people unwilling to take the risk of opposing their elders or the socio-culture-legal framework that oppressed them and then using a victim mentality to justify their position. Do they really believe the rest of us got there without our own fights and struggles?

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  7. Glad you wrote about this book. I am 48th in line at the library and waiting to get my copy. With 22 copies available for circulation, I hope to get mine before the end of this month.

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  8. Kindle edition…this is probably a dumb question..but do you use the Kindle? Have you had any issues using it/downloading books in India? I plan on buying one for my mom butI heard people were having trouble downloading books on their kindles in India

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    • Yes Carvaka. So often, I have to suffix my “I am a feminist and a proud one at that” with “But I don’t burn bras or hate men. I happen to deeply love and respect all the men in my life”. Why is it so hard for the general society to understand that I’m just an adult who wants to be treated like an adult for whatever I’m worth?

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  9. IHM, I am so glad you liked it so much. Was re-reading it- I love the portion on men being feminists- she calls them glorious- “so that the rest us of can swoon over them”.
    Surely folk are kidding when they talk about “women’s privilege”. Privilege for what? being felt up in public? or being cat called? being denied some jobs? being judged to different standards in a job interview? getting less money for the same amount of work? or being discriminated against everywhere? Oh you mean the politeness some men willingly and others grudgingly show when opening doors or giving up their seats in the bus? Honestly, most women would willingly forego that “privilege” to stop fighting the fight to be treated like a normal human being.

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  10. To the author of ‘How to be a woman’,

    Congratulations that you are a feminist and you’ve given the time to write a book issuing all vagina holders a certificate in feminism. Very thoughtful indeed.

    Just that, I don’t need to declare I have a vagina…and no, I don’t need feminism. And most definitely, having or not having a vagina doesn’t make me anything but a human. Yes, I can be anything I want to be but you got to be kidding if you declare me a feminist (fill in any fancy name for that matter) based upon your whimsical assumptions. No I am not a feminist…I have nothing against feminism but I also don’t care for it and that’s how I roll. And you know how i know I am not a feminist? It’s because nothing about this book (starting from the title) interests me. I would not pick it up if it was the last book on earth to read. That doesn’t mean it is not a great book. It certainly is for those who are interested in the subject!! I am not. So, please exclude me from your declarations of what I am…what I should or should not believe in or claim to be.

    Best,
    J

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  11. I am human…a woman yes, but I don’t need to be a feminist to be a woman…just as I don’t have to belong to any particular religion to be a human. I find it stifling (almost claustrophobic) when people try to push any belief or idea onto me, without me being interested in it first. I don’t know if I am the only one who feels this way…but I certainly do not appreciate when I am told, I have to believe in a certain idea to be something I have always naturally been.I love the simplicity of life and its challenges. You have a problem…use your common sense and strength of character to first face it, and with courage and the right attitude, solve it intelligently. Use the same to help others in need. Whether you are a man, a woman, a transgender or even a child.That is all that makes sense to me. Why can’t I not be labelled anything and still be a strong, independent, brave, intelligent woman?

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    • “Why can’t I not be labelled anything and still be a strong, independent, brave, intelligent woman?”
      Joyee, I understand u hate labelling. That is fine. But you said you want to be strong independent and brave woman. If you want to be all that and is ready to fight for your independence rather than meekly surrendering to the society’s patriarchal control you become a feminist. Even if you don’t like that label.

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      • Thanks Arun for pushing that down my throat🙂
        I don’t mind being ‘called’ a feminist, its just that I know I can never ‘be’ one. I have always been strong, independent, strong-headed and bold to begin with, even before I knew of the term ‘feminism’. I can also be submissive, subservient, obedient if and when I choose to. I don’t like to be pigeon-holed. Feminism to me feels as obstructive as any other idea people in this world are obsessed with. The moment someone tells me ‘how to be’…I instinctively step back. Into ‘my’ zone of complete, unconditional freedom.

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        • Joyee,
          So you are really independent. You can choose how you want to be. A real practicing feminist.

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  12. When I heard about the book, frankly, the title kind of put me off. But reading this post is making me want to read it (of course the subject matter is immensely interesting!) Going off now to order it🙂

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  13. Honestly, I balked at the first few paragraphs–highly reductive, the first few lines, and the quote about sexism might as well be straight off an MRA page–but she won me over with the rest.

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  14. Pingback: [link] What the Girls spat on Twitter, and Caitlin Moran, tells us about feminism « slendermeans

  15. Pingback: quick hit: What the Girls spat on Twitter, and Caitlin Moran, tells us about feminism

  16. Pingback: What the Girls spat on Twitter, and Caitlin Moran, tells us about feminism

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